Crucial Compliance collaboration enhances Fitzdares’ player protection approach 

Crucial Compliance has partnered with Fitzdares as the gambling operator taps into the Crucial Player Protection (CPP) system. 

The integration of CPP enables Fitzdares to compare player behaviour through both a wider cohort and against individual benchmarked behaviour over time, an option the firm believes is pivotal to minimising gambling related harm. 

Sam McKnight, Head of UK Compliance at Fitzdares, said: “We take player protection incredibly seriously and in Crucial Compliance we have a partner that can provide us with the platform and tools we need to take safer gambling to the next level. 

“Its technology is at the cutting edge of safer gambling and is always supported by an experienced team on hand to ensure that we maximise the potential of the platform and tools available through Crucial Player Protection. 

“This partnership is evidence of our commitment to safer gambling and compliance and will be crucial to our success in the UK market and beyond.” 

The ultimate aim, according to Crucial Compliance, is to improve the accuracy of review for AML and responsible gambling to increase the protection of at-risk players. 

Andy Masters, COO at Crucial Compliance, added: “We are delighted to have partnered with Fitzdares and to be providing the operator with our powerful Crucial Player Protection solution.

“It is the only compliance platform that has been built from the ground up by compliance professionals for the specific purpose of compliance and with a focus on a single view and holistic player protection. 

“CPP improves the output and efficiency of the compliance team, allowing the Fitzdares team to focus on the most at-risk players. The tool is also supported by an experienced training, data and analytical team who continue to support the needs of the business in an ever changing regulatory landscape”

The partnership with Fitzdares comes in the same month Crucial Compliance announced its African expansion. 

As part of its African growth strategy, the firm has vowed that its ambitions aim to tackle the continent’s “cultural and systemic problems”, which it notes lead to “unprofitable and unsustainable gaming” and contributes to an “underbelly of addiction” that has gone “completely under the radar”.